Play 4 Conference– Well-being of Primary School Children

An experiential and underpinning knowledge based play conference to support a range of professionals and those working with children with emotional hurts.

Play 4 Conference – Emotional Social Physical and Intellectual Well-being of Primary School Children

 

Course aims and objectives:

An experiential and underpinning knowledge based play conference to support a range of professionals and those working with children with emotional hurts.

  1. The conference includes the following workshops:
    Therapeutic value of play (am only) – Emotional and Social Lead: Prof Fraser Brown 
    What is it about play and playwork that makes it therapeutic? A theoretical base with insights from practice.
  2. Whole body engagement - Physical Lead: Play Support Workers from the Play Team
    Roll, hang, balance, spin & climb - Stimulating the 5 basic movements to experience a greater sense of self. (Please wear suitable outdoor clothing for this interactive session)
  3. Play and the brain - Social and Intellectual Lead: Rhian Beynon – Adoption Services 
    A brief look at how the brain needs to be stimulated by attentive adults and stimuli in order to 
    develop healthily.
  4. Letting out the hurt stuff – Social Lead: Jen Scott (BCEP)
    Forest school as a space for being the victor and vanquished. To whack, hit and pummel in the safety of play, knowing it’s not for real and no one will get hurt. (Please wear suitable outdoor clothing for this interactive session)
  5. The practice of therapeutic play - Emotional Lead Claire Eady & Abi Cassani - Adoption Service Using the principles of play therapy and a range of media to support children’s self expression, a hands-on interactive session.
  6. Why do children make weapons? (p.m. only) – Emotional and Social Lead: Play Officers Every stage of mankind is expressed in children’s play, explore underpinning knowledge of 
    recapitulative play that enables children to access earlier human evolutionary stages.
  7. Theraplay Techniques - Physical and emotional Lead: Johanne Cottle, Children’s 
    Residential Practitioner Theraplay is based on attachment theory and supports adults and 
    children to develop positive relationships through a wide range of focused playful tactile activities.

There will be two key note speakers 
Professor Fraser Brown

Internationally renowned for research into the effects of therapeutic playwork on a group of abandoned orphans in Romania. He is also the only UK Professor of Playwork and is Head of Playwork at Leeds Beckett University.

Alison Smith
Specialist Teaching Team, Behaviour Support Service. 
Who works alongside primary schools supporting 
children for whom full-time mainstream education is 
challenging owing to their emotional, behavioural 
and/or social difficulties.

Cost:

£10 per foster carer or adoptive parent
£20 per person for out-of-school settings or £60 for the whole team
£40 per person for PACT HR schools or £120 for 5 people
£50 per person for all other schools or £150 for 5 people
Free to Bradford Council employees (Where your training budget is held centrally by Bradford Council)

To help us meet the Council’s quality and sufficiency duty, settings that are graded ‘inadequate’, ‘requires improvement’ or ‘not met’ at their last Ofsted inspection, will receive a 50% subsidy towards the cost of courses. 
The subsidy is only provided for training that directly addresses actions identified at their last Ofsted inspection

Date and venue:

Friday 4th March 2016 - (9.00am - 2.30pm) @ Victoria Hall, Hard Ings Road, Keighley, BD21 3JN

To book places

Please complete the booking form on the link below.

Link to the Workforce Development training course databaseLink to the Workforce Development Booking Form

If you have any queries about this course, please contact Workforce Development on 01274 434503.


Opportunity

Published: 03/02/2016
Audience: Playworkers; Primary Schools staff - Learning Mentors, PSHE leads; Forest School Practitioners; PRU
Contact: Sadaf Iqbal

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